Masters Theses

Keywords and Phrases

Solid state transformer (SST)

Abstract

"Electrical power systems are continuously facing increasing electrical power demand in the last years to meet the requirements of modern life style. In order to satisfy such needs electricity authorities are taking appropriate measures to enhance the performance of power networks. One of the solutions to meet the customer's demands for energy was the trend to use the renewable energy. The increasing use of renewable energy and other distributed generation sources made the electrical grid more complex. Many researches have been carried out to find out solutions to overcome this complexity. One of these researches -- which was on a Solid-State Transformer technology- attracted scholars in recent years. The motivation for this thesis is to study the behavior of the SST under operation of protective devices such as recloser and fuse.

In order to investigate the dynamic behavior of the SST, a recloser model has been designed and implemented in PSCAD®/EMTDC™. The accuracy of the model has been verified through comparison between simulation and theoretical results. Then, the recloser model has been deployed in a small distribution system along with the SST. Finally, different SLG fault scenarios have been applied and the SST has been investigated"--Abstract, page iii.

Advisor(s)

Crow, Mariesa

Committee Member(s)

Kimball, Jonathan W.
Ferdowsi, Mehdi

Department(s)

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Electrical Engineering

Sponsor(s)

Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission
King Abdul Aziz University

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

Summer 2015

Pagination

xii, 88 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographic references (pages 85-87).

Rights

© 2015 Fahd Amin Hariri, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Electric power distribution
Renewable energy sources
Distributed generation of electric power

Thesis Number

T 10739

Electronic OCLC #

921185923

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