Masters Theses

Author

Wen-Chiang Tu

Abstract

"The development of ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites has been shown to be a promising approach for high toughness ceramic materials. The purpose of this work was to develop a new ceramic matrix composite(CMC) system based on a porous mullitic matrix reinforced with ceramic fibers. Unidirectional alligned fiber reinforced mullitic matrix composites were fabricated by a filament winding process. Prepregs were laminated and thermal processed in air. SEM fractographs of the composites were characterized and related to the observed load-deflection behaviors under 3-point flexure. The fracture surface expositions changed from extensive fiber tear-out to limited fiber pull-out as the firing temperature increased from 1250°C to 1450°C. Porosity of the current CMC system appeared to be less insensitive to the firing temperature than did the strength. Increase in strength as the firing temperature increased from 1150°C to 1250°C was considered to be the result of development of a stronger bond between fibers and matrix. However, strength of the composite decreased as the firing temperature increased from 1250°C to 1450°C due to the degradation of the reinforcing fibers. SEM fractography and load-deflection behavior of a Tyranno fiber reinforced porous mullitic matrix composite, fired at 1250°C, showed characteristics of ceramic matrix composites toughened by matrix/fiber interaction mechanisms. Although the flexure strength of this CMC system was fairly low(178 MPa), the results provide a basis for further investigation of low to medium temperature systems, toughened by the tear-out mechanism"--Abstract, page ii.

Department(s)

Materials Science and Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Ceramic Engineering

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

Fall 1988

Pagination

vi, 46 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 23-26).

Rights

© 1988 Wen-Chiang Tu, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Restricted Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Thesis Number

T 5789

Print OCLC #

19473189

Electronic OCLC #

1044760105

Link to Catalog Record

Electronic access to the full-text of this document is restricted to Missouri S&T users. Otherwise, request this publication directly from Missouri S&T Library or contact your local library.

http://laurel.lso.missouri.edu/record=b2140325~S5

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