Masters Theses

Abstract

"The purpose of this research study was to investigate the effect of biological activities on the desorption of pesticides from humic acid solids. The pesticides selected in this study are dieldrin and heptachlor, both of which have been commonly used in agricultural applications. The humic acid adsorbent was extracted from a coal-like substance called "leonardite", which has a humus content of as high as 53 percent by weight. The first step of this study involved a proper cultivation of biological culture so that the culture could be adapted to a test environment containing a high concentration of humic acids. The degree of acclimation and the corresponding biological activity were determined by the microbial capability of stabilizing sewage organics as well as glucose. The second step of the study involved the addition of pesticide-coated humic acid solids to a series of aeration units containing cultivated biological cultures. Each unit was subjected to a certain properly designed condition. The extent of pesticide desorption in each unit was carefully monitored. Results of this study indicate that although humic acids are not amenable to biodegradation, they do not inhibit any biological activity. Also, the active biological activities maintained in the aeration units do not appear to exert any significant influence on the dieldrin and heptachlor desorption from humic acids"--Abstract, pages ii-iii.

Advisor(s)

Huang, Ju-Chang, 1941-

Committee Member(s)

TerKonda, Purush
Bolter, Ernst

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Civil Engineering

Sponsor(s)

United States. Office of Water Resources Research

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

1972

Pagination

x, 99 pages

Rights

© 1972 Loh-Tien Chiang, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Pesticides -- Analysis
Humic acid
Thermal desorption
Sewage -- Purification -- Activated sludge process

Thesis Number

T 2699

Print OCLC #

6039076

Electronic OCLC #

881828535

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