Masters Theses

Abstract

"During World War II the Federal Government restricted oil-field drilling in the United States in order to conserve steel. The wartime regulations required 40-acre spacing in most areas. At the close of the war, the Federal drilling restrictions were lifted, and control of oil-well spacing reverted to the several state regulatory bodies. Each of these state agencies was then confronted with this problem: should 40-acre spacing be continued or should pre-war 10- and 20-acre spacing patterns be re-established?

The regulatory authority in Kansas, the State Corporation Commission, ordered an investigation in January, 1946, for the purpose of developing information upon which a disposition of the spacing problem might be based. Most of the data reported herein were obtained in connection with a study made by the author for the Kansas Commission, at that time"--Preface, page iii.

Advisor(s)

Martin, R. I.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Mining Engineering

Publisher

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Publication Date

1951

Pagination

ix, 99 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (page 98).

Geographic Coverage

Kansas

Rights

© 1951 Langdon B. Taylor, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Oil fields -- Production methods
Oil well drilling

Thesis Number

T 983

Print OCLC #

5985200

Electronic OCLC #

953420574

Comments

Master of Science in Mining Engineering, Petroleum Engineering option

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Thesis Location

 
COinS