Session Start Date

11-4-2004

Session End Date

11-5-2004

Abstract

This paper presents two examples to the theory and finite element implementation of plasticity. The first example is on the cross-sectional behavior of trapezoidal sheeting subjected to a concentrated load. It is shown that the number of elements (and thus the number of integration points) along the comer radius are important for the correct modeling of this static problem. The second example is on the failure of first-generation sheeting subjected to a concentrated load and a bending moment. This problem, especially for large span lengths, can be solved only with explicit dynamic simulations. These are, for our research field, for the first time published here. The explicit simulations normally function with a rather simple integration scheme for plasticity; is shown that our sheeting results are very sensitive to this.

Author

Herm Hofmeyer

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Research Center/Lab(s)

Wei-Wen Yu Center for Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Meeting Name

17th International Specialty Conference on Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

11-4-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Cold-Formed Steel Examples to the Theory and Finite Element Implementation of Plasticity

This paper presents two examples to the theory and finite element implementation of plasticity. The first example is on the cross-sectional behavior of trapezoidal sheeting subjected to a concentrated load. It is shown that the number of elements (and thus the number of integration points) along the comer radius are important for the correct modeling of this static problem. The second example is on the failure of first-generation sheeting subjected to a concentrated load and a bending moment. This problem, especially for large span lengths, can be solved only with explicit dynamic simulations. These are, for our research field, for the first time published here. The explicit simulations normally function with a rather simple integration scheme for plasticity; is shown that our sheeting results are very sensitive to this.