Session Start Date

10-19-2000

Abstract

A common application of cold formed steel in building construction is for wind load bearing steel studs (curtain walls). These wall studs are designed to carry lateral load only, and frame into horizontal steel track members at the top and bottom of the wall assembly. The stud-to-track connection consists of studs framing perpendicularly into the track and are connected with sheet metal screws. The design of the wall stud must include a check of the web crippling capacity at the end reactions. The current design expressions, however, do not apply to the type of bearing in these stud-to-track connections. Reported in this paper are the results and analysis of a collection of end-one-flange web crippling tests of common stud-to-track connections. The analysis shows that there are two failure modes: web crippling of the stud and punch-through of the track flange. Design expressions have been developed to predict the ultimate capacity of the connection based on these two modes of failure. The effects of increasing the gap between the end of the stud and the web of the track, as well as the effects of missing screws in the stud-to-track connection are also discussed.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Research Center/Lab(s)

Wei-Wen Yu Center for Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Meeting Name

15th International Specialty Conference on Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

10-19-2000

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2000 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Oct 19th, 12:00 AM

Lateral Strength of Wind Load Bearing Wall Stud-to-track Connection

A common application of cold formed steel in building construction is for wind load bearing steel studs (curtain walls). These wall studs are designed to carry lateral load only, and frame into horizontal steel track members at the top and bottom of the wall assembly. The stud-to-track connection consists of studs framing perpendicularly into the track and are connected with sheet metal screws. The design of the wall stud must include a check of the web crippling capacity at the end reactions. The current design expressions, however, do not apply to the type of bearing in these stud-to-track connections. Reported in this paper are the results and analysis of a collection of end-one-flange web crippling tests of common stud-to-track connections. The analysis shows that there are two failure modes: web crippling of the stud and punch-through of the track flange. Design expressions have been developed to predict the ultimate capacity of the connection based on these two modes of failure. The effects of increasing the gap between the end of the stud and the web of the track, as well as the effects of missing screws in the stud-to-track connection are also discussed.