Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

3-26-2001

Session End Date

3-31-2001

Abstract

This paper presents the results of several resonant column tests carried out in a large variety of soils, including lateritic and saprolitic tropical soils. The data analysed are restricted to the strain dependence of shear modulus in the range of 10-6 to 10-2. Despite the different isotropic consolidated stresses, degrees of saturation and overconsolidation ratios applied for the different types of soil, all the test results fit very well in a previous proposed normalised curve of G/G0 as a function of γ/γ0.7, where γ0.7 is the shear strain corresponding to a value of G≈0.7 x G0. The hyperbolic stress-strain equation can conveniently describe this fitting. Simple practical relationships are also proposed for tropical soils to the prediction of G0 and γ0.7 allowing with the normalised curve to estimate shear modulus in the strain range relevant to the service state of many civil engineering structures.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-26-2001

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2001 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 31st, 12:00 AM

An Approach to Predict Shear Modulus of Soils in the Range of 10-6 to 10-2 Strain Levels

San Diego, California

This paper presents the results of several resonant column tests carried out in a large variety of soils, including lateritic and saprolitic tropical soils. The data analysed are restricted to the strain dependence of shear modulus in the range of 10-6 to 10-2. Despite the different isotropic consolidated stresses, degrees of saturation and overconsolidation ratios applied for the different types of soil, all the test results fit very well in a previous proposed normalised curve of G/G0 as a function of γ/γ0.7, where γ0.7 is the shear strain corresponding to a value of G≈0.7 x G0. The hyperbolic stress-strain equation can conveniently describe this fitting. Simple practical relationships are also proposed for tropical soils to the prediction of G0 and γ0.7 allowing with the normalised curve to estimate shear modulus in the strain range relevant to the service state of many civil engineering structures.