Location

Chicago, Illinois

Session Start Date

4-29-2013

Session End Date

5-4-2013

Abstract

The McColl Superfund site was one of the highest-profile hazardous waste sites in the USA in the 1980’s. The 12 unlined pits containing refinery waste from World War II presented unique challenges for closure construction and post-closure redevelopment due the caustic nature, low bearing capacity, and high odor potential of the waste, the proximity of residences, and a mandate to restore portions of a golf course over several of the pits. Closure design included special testing to demonstrate the durability of materials that could potentially come in contact with the waste and to evaluate the potential for migration of waste through native subsurface materials, design of a lightweight geosynthetic cap on top of the waste, reconstruction using mechanically stabilized earth of a non-engineered waste-retaining embankments separating the waste, and construction of a slurry wall up a 3H:1V (Horizontal to Vertical) slope. Closure design and construction was originally estimated to cost $18 to $20 million dollars and take three years to complete. However, design and construction was completed in two years at a cost of approximately $13 million dollars through the use of an engineering, procurement, and construction management (EPCM) strategy and a unique “over-the-shoulder” review arrangement with the regulatory agencies.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Seventh Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

4-29-2013

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2013 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 29th, 12:00 AM May 4th, 12:00 AM

Closure and Post-Closure Redevelopment of the McColl Superfund Site

Chicago, Illinois

The McColl Superfund site was one of the highest-profile hazardous waste sites in the USA in the 1980’s. The 12 unlined pits containing refinery waste from World War II presented unique challenges for closure construction and post-closure redevelopment due the caustic nature, low bearing capacity, and high odor potential of the waste, the proximity of residences, and a mandate to restore portions of a golf course over several of the pits. Closure design included special testing to demonstrate the durability of materials that could potentially come in contact with the waste and to evaluate the potential for migration of waste through native subsurface materials, design of a lightweight geosynthetic cap on top of the waste, reconstruction using mechanically stabilized earth of a non-engineered waste-retaining embankments separating the waste, and construction of a slurry wall up a 3H:1V (Horizontal to Vertical) slope. Closure design and construction was originally estimated to cost $18 to $20 million dollars and take three years to complete. However, design and construction was completed in two years at a cost of approximately $13 million dollars through the use of an engineering, procurement, and construction management (EPCM) strategy and a unique “over-the-shoulder” review arrangement with the regulatory agencies.