Alternative Title

Paper No. 9.16 L

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

In June of 1994 a 20-m section of 1.4-m diameter, restrained-joint, ductile iron pipe failed during construction of a new section of water pipeline for the city of Cairo in the Arab Republic of Egypt. The failure occurred in an area where the pipe was supported on piles, and compacted silica sand was used as side support for the pipe. Soil above the crown of the failed section of pipe was 6 m or more in thickness. Results of a detailed review of the failure revealed that a number of unique and related factors apparently caused the failure. The most significant of these causes was the native soil surrounding the pipeline, which was formed from an accumulation of 800 years of building and construction debris. At the location of the failure the debris was in excess of 15-m thick. When subjected to water at this location, this debris underwent significant settlement, which eventually led to loss in side support for the pipeline. To repair the pipeline and to avoid future similar failures, a utilidor was used to protect the pipeline in areas where overburden thickness was greater than 4.5 m, and a pipe encasement was used where the overburden thickness was less.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Failure of a Pipeline in an 800-year Old Debris Fill

St. Louis, Missouri

In June of 1994 a 20-m section of 1.4-m diameter, restrained-joint, ductile iron pipe failed during construction of a new section of water pipeline for the city of Cairo in the Arab Republic of Egypt. The failure occurred in an area where the pipe was supported on piles, and compacted silica sand was used as side support for the pipe. Soil above the crown of the failed section of pipe was 6 m or more in thickness. Results of a detailed review of the failure revealed that a number of unique and related factors apparently caused the failure. The most significant of these causes was the native soil surrounding the pipeline, which was formed from an accumulation of 800 years of building and construction debris. At the location of the failure the debris was in excess of 15-m thick. When subjected to water at this location, this debris underwent significant settlement, which eventually led to loss in side support for the pipeline. To repair the pipeline and to avoid future similar failures, a utilidor was used to protect the pipeline in areas where overburden thickness was greater than 4.5 m, and a pipe encasement was used where the overburden thickness was less.