Alternative Title

Paper No. 6.16 N

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

A geotechnical evaluation was conducted of thirteen emergency impoundment basins constructed to retain fluids from catastrophic tank failure at a petroleum facility. The berms creating the impoundments were constructed on bedrock, weathered bedrock, slope wash, and lightly compacted fill derived from weathered bedrock.

Site materials ranged from fractured rock, to clayey gravel, to gravelly sand. Consequently, standard geotechnical tests for strength and permeability were difficult to perform, and test results were not often representative of the entire range of properties at each basin. Therefore, a systematic method of testing or estimating strength and permeability ranges was established. In order of decreasing confidence, shear strength was measured by laboratory tests, correlation with similar materials from another basin, standard penetration tests, and qualitative influence of grain size distribution. Permeability was measured by laboratory tests, correlation with similar materials from another basin, estimation based on grain size, and estimation based on material descriptions.

In general, the weathered rock proved ideal for use as berm material. The angular rock pieces produced a high friction angle, and the clay component added cohesion and reduced the permeability. These conclusions were based on both laboratory tests and long-term field performance.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 8th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Stability and Permeability of Fluid Retention Berms Constructed From Highly Weathered Bedrock

St. Louis, Missouri

A geotechnical evaluation was conducted of thirteen emergency impoundment basins constructed to retain fluids from catastrophic tank failure at a petroleum facility. The berms creating the impoundments were constructed on bedrock, weathered bedrock, slope wash, and lightly compacted fill derived from weathered bedrock.

Site materials ranged from fractured rock, to clayey gravel, to gravelly sand. Consequently, standard geotechnical tests for strength and permeability were difficult to perform, and test results were not often representative of the entire range of properties at each basin. Therefore, a systematic method of testing or estimating strength and permeability ranges was established. In order of decreasing confidence, shear strength was measured by laboratory tests, correlation with similar materials from another basin, standard penetration tests, and qualitative influence of grain size distribution. Permeability was measured by laboratory tests, correlation with similar materials from another basin, estimation based on grain size, and estimation based on material descriptions.

In general, the weathered rock proved ideal for use as berm material. The angular rock pieces produced a high friction angle, and the clay component added cohesion and reduced the permeability. These conclusions were based on both laboratory tests and long-term field performance.