Alternative Title

Paper No. 3.22

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

Morphoseismic features arc new landforms produced by earthquakes or pre-existing landforms modified by them. The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) contains thousands of earthquake-related surface features distributed over 13,000 square kilometers. They are attributable to some combination of (1) seismically-induced liquefaction, (2) secondary deformation, and (3) seismically-induced slope failures. Most were produced by the series of great earthquakes that occurred in 1811-12, but some predate and some postdate those events. They are being modified by ongoing activities such a fluvial processes, mass wasting, eolian processes, hydrologically-induced liquefaction (HIL), mechanically-induced liquefaction (MJL), and human activities.

Dynamic responses to ground motion include sand extrusion, sand intrusion, lateral spreading, faulting, subsidence, uplift, stream modification, landsliding, groundwater flooding, and explosion cratering. We have identified thirty-four types of morphoseismic features. While the formation of these features during and following earthquakes can be devastating to engineering structures in place at the time of the ground motion, they pose unique hazards to structures built over them for all subsequent time. Geotechnical engineers working in the NMSZ, or any other region where large earthquakes occur, need to recognize and compensate for them.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Morphoseismic Features in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (central USA) and their Implications for Geotechnical Engineering

St. Louis, Missouri

Morphoseismic features arc new landforms produced by earthquakes or pre-existing landforms modified by them. The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) contains thousands of earthquake-related surface features distributed over 13,000 square kilometers. They are attributable to some combination of (1) seismically-induced liquefaction, (2) secondary deformation, and (3) seismically-induced slope failures. Most were produced by the series of great earthquakes that occurred in 1811-12, but some predate and some postdate those events. They are being modified by ongoing activities such a fluvial processes, mass wasting, eolian processes, hydrologically-induced liquefaction (HIL), mechanically-induced liquefaction (MJL), and human activities.

Dynamic responses to ground motion include sand extrusion, sand intrusion, lateral spreading, faulting, subsidence, uplift, stream modification, landsliding, groundwater flooding, and explosion cratering. We have identified thirty-four types of morphoseismic features. While the formation of these features during and following earthquakes can be devastating to engineering structures in place at the time of the ground motion, they pose unique hazards to structures built over them for all subsequent time. Geotechnical engineers working in the NMSZ, or any other region where large earthquakes occur, need to recognize and compensate for them.