Alternative Title

Paper No. 2.44

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

A large slide of great complexity, occurred on February 18, 1995 near the village of Malakasa, 36 km North of Athens, and disrupted road and rail traffic between Athens and Thessaloniki. The material in which the slide occurred can be described as a chaotic mixture of schists and breccias which have been highly disturbed by tectonic events, by ancient landslide activity and the prevailing high groundwater pressures. An understanding of the groundwater conditions in the Malakasa landslide was essential in designing remedial measures to stabilize the slide. The presence of a permanent spring and high water levels measured near the toe of the slide affects the sliding conditions. To better evaluate the impact of the groundwater on the overall stability of the slide, this paper presents the results of an in depth 3D study of the groundwater flow in the vicinity of the rupture surface and examines several draining options at the toe of the slide.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Groundwater Conditions and Drainage of a Large Slide

St. Louis, Missouri

A large slide of great complexity, occurred on February 18, 1995 near the village of Malakasa, 36 km North of Athens, and disrupted road and rail traffic between Athens and Thessaloniki. The material in which the slide occurred can be described as a chaotic mixture of schists and breccias which have been highly disturbed by tectonic events, by ancient landslide activity and the prevailing high groundwater pressures. An understanding of the groundwater conditions in the Malakasa landslide was essential in designing remedial measures to stabilize the slide. The presence of a permanent spring and high water levels measured near the toe of the slide affects the sliding conditions. To better evaluate the impact of the groundwater on the overall stability of the slide, this paper presents the results of an in depth 3D study of the groundwater flow in the vicinity of the rupture surface and examines several draining options at the toe of the slide.