Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

Reinforced Earth techniques are fast growing procedures within geotechnical engineering practice. The ease and flexibility of the techniques make them widely accepted. In the last two decades, considerable advances have been realized in utilization of concepts in retaining structures. The analysis and design procedures for earth reinforced retaining walls had been exercised within Rankin and Mohr Coulomb theory. An earth retaining model wall was designed according to Mohr Coulomb theory with minimum factor of safety. The wall was constructed in the laboratory in much the same way as the large walls in the fields. The wall was then brought to failure by surcharge loading, during which wall behavior was monitored. The maximum surcharge load that induced failure and the mode of failure was observed. Stresses in the reinforcement strips were compared with those predicted by the theory. The efficiency, usefulness and conservativity of the technique was outlined.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Model Test of Reinforced Earth Retaining Wall

Reinforced Earth techniques are fast growing procedures within geotechnical engineering practice. The ease and flexibility of the techniques make them widely accepted. In the last two decades, considerable advances have been realized in utilization of concepts in retaining structures. The analysis and design procedures for earth reinforced retaining walls had been exercised within Rankin and Mohr Coulomb theory. An earth retaining model wall was designed according to Mohr Coulomb theory with minimum factor of safety. The wall was constructed in the laboratory in much the same way as the large walls in the fields. The wall was then brought to failure by surcharge loading, during which wall behavior was monitored. The maximum surcharge load that induced failure and the mode of failure was observed. Stresses in the reinforcement strips were compared with those predicted by the theory. The efficiency, usefulness and conservativity of the technique was outlined.