Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

This paper analyzes a braced excavation executed during the construction of Rio de Janeiro City subway along a street (Catete Street) in which several old and historical buildings existed and should be preserved. The excavation had an average depth of 13 meters and was executed almost ten years ago in a subsoil in which the principal problems were caused by a 6 meters thick loose sand layer, underlaid by a 4 meter thick silty organic clay layer. Several buildings were damaged and had to be repaired. The objective of this paper is to show that even using the incomplete laboratory and field testing data available at the time the design was made, some of this damage could be predicted and, therefore, possibly prevented. The paper firstly describes the excavation and the available information on the subsoil materials. Subsequently, a finite element analysis is made and the results are correlated to observed damage.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Field Observation and Finite Element Analysis of a Subway Excavation

This paper analyzes a braced excavation executed during the construction of Rio de Janeiro City subway along a street (Catete Street) in which several old and historical buildings existed and should be preserved. The excavation had an average depth of 13 meters and was executed almost ten years ago in a subsoil in which the principal problems were caused by a 6 meters thick loose sand layer, underlaid by a 4 meter thick silty organic clay layer. Several buildings were damaged and had to be repaired. The objective of this paper is to show that even using the incomplete laboratory and field testing data available at the time the design was made, some of this damage could be predicted and, therefore, possibly prevented. The paper firstly describes the excavation and the available information on the subsoil materials. Subsequently, a finite element analysis is made and the results are correlated to observed damage.