Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

The goal in characterizing radioactively contaminated soil is to quantify the degree of contamination and its parameters. A cost effective, small scale characterization is done by performing a surface radiological survey with subsurface data coming from boreholes augered in a tight grid pattern. Confidence in the between-hole extrapolations depends on the grid size. However, at the widely contaminated site in Maywood, New Jersey a grid width of 100 feet was the only economical choice. Accurate contamination parameters were determined despite the wide hole spacings once geologists and health physicists learned how local geologic conditions controlled the contamination's location and extent. The contamination pathway was found to be fluvially dependent, and various logged soil types could be confirmed by their distinctive radiologic signatures. With this knowledge, grid drilling was abandoned. Drillhole sites were individually selected based on geologically supported, between-hole extrapolations thereby eliminating many costly boreholes.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Complementing Radiologic Data With Geology – A Case History

The goal in characterizing radioactively contaminated soil is to quantify the degree of contamination and its parameters. A cost effective, small scale characterization is done by performing a surface radiological survey with subsurface data coming from boreholes augered in a tight grid pattern. Confidence in the between-hole extrapolations depends on the grid size. However, at the widely contaminated site in Maywood, New Jersey a grid width of 100 feet was the only economical choice. Accurate contamination parameters were determined despite the wide hole spacings once geologists and health physicists learned how local geologic conditions controlled the contamination's location and extent. The contamination pathway was found to be fluvially dependent, and various logged soil types could be confirmed by their distinctive radiologic signatures. With this knowledge, grid drilling was abandoned. Drillhole sites were individually selected based on geologically supported, between-hole extrapolations thereby eliminating many costly boreholes.