Session Start Date

5-6-1984

Abstract

Strong ground-motion attenuation relations take on a variety of forms, depending upon the parameters used to express the relations and upon the geographic area for which the equations are developed. In general the strong ground-motion parameters, namely acceleration, velocity, displacement and response spectra ordinates, are taken to be proportional to the distance from the earthquake source to the site, to the magnitude or some measure of the strength of the earthquake source, and to loss factors resulting from transmission of energy through the inelastic earth. In certain areas of the world, where strong-motion data are abundant, empirical relations can be developed to express these relations. In other areas of the world, where strong-motion data are few or are entirely lacking, more attention must be given to theoretical considerations. In this paper we give case histories of two such types of regions, namely western North America with an abundance of data and eastern North America with a paucity of data.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

5-6-1984

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1984 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 6th, 12:00 AM

A Comparison of Methods of Estimating the Attenuation of Earthquake Strong Ground Motion

Strong ground-motion attenuation relations take on a variety of forms, depending upon the parameters used to express the relations and upon the geographic area for which the equations are developed. In general the strong ground-motion parameters, namely acceleration, velocity, displacement and response spectra ordinates, are taken to be proportional to the distance from the earthquake source to the site, to the magnitude or some measure of the strength of the earthquake source, and to loss factors resulting from transmission of energy through the inelastic earth. In certain areas of the world, where strong-motion data are abundant, empirical relations can be developed to express these relations. In other areas of the world, where strong-motion data are few or are entirely lacking, more attention must be given to theoretical considerations. In this paper we give case histories of two such types of regions, namely western North America with an abundance of data and eastern North America with a paucity of data.