Session Start Date

5-6-1984

Abstract

A data bank containing records from 1000 load tests on driven piles was set up. A computer program was developed to access the data bank and perform capacity analyses using a variety of methods. Analyses using six methods in clay and three in sand are reported here. For piles in clay, the capacities were predicted with tolerable accuracy by all methods, whereas the scatter was large for all methods for piles in sand. Generally, capacities were higher for tapered piles then indicated by the analyses. Tensile and compressive side shear capacities were essentially the same. The capacities of open and closed ended pipe piles were predicted with equal accuracy. Limits on side shear and tip stresses were helpful in reducing overpredictions.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

5-6-1984

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1984 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 6th, 12:00 AM

Prediction of Axial Pile Capacity Based on Case Histories

A data bank containing records from 1000 load tests on driven piles was set up. A computer program was developed to access the data bank and perform capacity analyses using a variety of methods. Analyses using six methods in clay and three in sand are reported here. For piles in clay, the capacities were predicted with tolerable accuracy by all methods, whereas the scatter was large for all methods for piles in sand. Generally, capacities were higher for tapered piles then indicated by the analyses. Tensile and compressive side shear capacities were essentially the same. The capacities of open and closed ended pipe piles were predicted with equal accuracy. Limits on side shear and tip stresses were helpful in reducing overpredictions.