Doctoral Dissertations

Abstract

"The applicability of power spectral density techniques, Fourier series analysis, and linear regression to the mathematical modeling of river water temperature is demonstrated. Consideration is also given to the problem of estimating thermal inputs to rivers from man-made sources such as electrical power plants. First, power spectral density techniques are used in the time-series analysis of water temperature records which were taken from the Missouri River. Two spectral ranges are then studied from the standpoint of their applicability to (1) mathematical model building and (2) detection and identification of cyclic thermal inputs. Next, a Fourier regression fit to the time-series data is used to show that normal random variates having zero mean are obtained when the regression curve is extracted from the data. A 60-day prediction of daily-average water temperature is then made using a model which is based upon a polynomial regression fit to the fluctuating amplitudes of significant Fourier components. A final predictive model, which is based on the above analysis methods, is proposed"--Abstract, page ii.

Advisor(s)

Gillett, Billy E.

Committee Member(s)

Ho, C. Y. (Chung You), 1933-1988
Pagano, Sylvester J., 1924-2006
Bain, Lee J., 1939-
Byers, James K.
Maxwell, James C.

Department(s)

Mathematics and Statistics

Degree Name

Ph. D. in Mathematics

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

1972

Pagination

viii, 108 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 84-86).

Geographic Coverage

Missouri River

Rights

© 1972 Leland Lovell Long, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Water temperature -- Mathematical models
Water temperature -- Missouri River -- Mathematical models
Thermal pollution of rivers, lakes, etc. -- Mathematical models

Thesis Number

T 2752

Print OCLC #

6034192

Electronic OCLC #

884440035

Included in

Mathematics Commons

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