Location

Rolla, Missouri

Session Dates

11 Jun 1999 - 17 Jun 1999

Keywords and Phrases

Friction Factors; Resistance; Atkinson

Abstract

Over the past fifteen years, engineers from Mine Ventilation Services, Inc. (MVS) have measured numerous friction factors at many different types of mining operations. The results of these measurements indicate that standardized friction factors referenced in most ventilation textbooks are greater than those measured in the field for similar airway support systems. Many referenced friction factors are still based on G. E. McElroy's classic paper "Engineering Factors in the Ventilation of Metal Mines" published in 1935. Most mechanized mines now incorporate airways that are larger, have more advanced support systems, and more uniform openings. This paper describes the measurement techniques and results from friction factor measurements taken during ventilation surveys at various mines with differing support systems. A comparison between textbook and measured values is also presented.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Meeting Name

8th U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Document Version

Final Version

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 11th, 12:00 AM Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

Practical Values of Friction Factors

Rolla, Missouri

Over the past fifteen years, engineers from Mine Ventilation Services, Inc. (MVS) have measured numerous friction factors at many different types of mining operations. The results of these measurements indicate that standardized friction factors referenced in most ventilation textbooks are greater than those measured in the field for similar airway support systems. Many referenced friction factors are still based on G. E. McElroy's classic paper "Engineering Factors in the Ventilation of Metal Mines" published in 1935. Most mechanized mines now incorporate airways that are larger, have more advanced support systems, and more uniform openings. This paper describes the measurement techniques and results from friction factor measurements taken during ventilation surveys at various mines with differing support systems. A comparison between textbook and measured values is also presented.