Title

Quantifying Nanoparticle Toxicity in Bacterial Cells

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biology and Psychology

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

OURE Fellows and EPA

Abstract

Pneumonia can come in all shapes and sizes. One form called Legionnaires' disease results from the Legionella pneumophila bacterium that contaminates water sources used by humans. The goal of this project is to find out the effectiveness of using copper nanoparticles to eradicate these bacterial colonies from pipes, showerheads, and other water reservoirs in order to reduce the likelihood of developing this form of pneumonia. The aim was to determine the concentration of nanoparticles that was the most effective in killing an avirulent strain of the bacteria (LP02) by performing serial dilutions, reading the OD600, and plating the dilutions to estimate colony counts. The results of this project indicate that the ideal concentration of nanoparticles for eliminating LP02 from the suspension is around 1:2000 ul/ml dilution.

Biography

Gabrielle Hightower is a junior from Kansas City, Missouri majoring in Biology and Psychology. She has participated in Missouri S&T's FYRE, OURE, and OURE Fellows programs as well as the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship through the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. She plans on using this experience once she graduates to obtain her PhD and conduct research. When she is not conducting research, she is an active member of Chi Omega, Missouri S&T Ballet and Dance Club, Blue Key, and SCRUBS.

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Final Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Ozark Room

Presentation Date

14 Apr 2022, 9:30 am - 10:00 am

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Apr 14th, 9:30 AM Apr 14th, 10:00 AM

Quantifying Nanoparticle Toxicity in Bacterial Cells

Ozark Room

Pneumonia can come in all shapes and sizes. One form called Legionnaires' disease results from the Legionella pneumophila bacterium that contaminates water sources used by humans. The goal of this project is to find out the effectiveness of using copper nanoparticles to eradicate these bacterial colonies from pipes, showerheads, and other water reservoirs in order to reduce the likelihood of developing this form of pneumonia. The aim was to determine the concentration of nanoparticles that was the most effective in killing an avirulent strain of the bacteria (LP02) by performing serial dilutions, reading the OD600, and plating the dilutions to estimate colony counts. The results of this project indicate that the ideal concentration of nanoparticles for eliminating LP02 from the suspension is around 1:2000 ul/ml dilution.