Title

Modeling Li-ion Battery Temperature and Degredation

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Major

Mechanical Engineering

Research Advisor

Park, Jonghyun

Advisor's Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Abstract

An ideal battery model must gather sufficient electrochemical data about the battery system while remaining computationally efficient. To prevent failure from thermal runaway and protect the battery health, understanding the thermal characteristics of a battery throughout its lifespan is essential, particularly for 3D applications in a battery pack.

To achieve this, a single particle battery model was coupled with a 3D heat generation component to simulate the heat generation and 3D heat transfer in a cell. Mathematical modeling equations were used to predict the growth of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer, the primary contributor to degradation. This cell model was applied to a 6-cell pack to observe pack heat transfer during degradation.

To validate this model, a 6-cell battery pack was created and tested experimentally. From this experimental data, parameter estimation was performed to understand the composition of each cell. This pack was then recreated and simulated to provide a reference for the battery model.

The results indicate a parabolic SEI thickness growth when cycling. This resulted in non-linear capacity loss, and due to the corresponding increase in cell resistance from SEI growth, the heat generation increased as the battery degraded. The 3D pack temperature was highest at the center of the pack due to heat transfer with surrounding cells.

Biography

Derrick Barger is a senior mechanical engineering student that is passionate about reducing humanity's reliance on fossil fuels. He has conducted research focused on battery modelling and simulation under the guidance of Dr. Jonghyun Park since the spring of 2020. Derrick became interested in this project because of the unique challenges associated with engineering in extreme temperature environments, particularly ultra-cold environments. After learning about the research process as an undergraduate student at Missouri S&T, he plans on pursuing his master's degree in cold climate engineering at the Arctic University of Norway in Tromso.

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Final Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Ozark Room

Presentation Date

14 Apr 2022, 9:00 am - 9:30 am

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Apr 14th, 9:00 AM Apr 14th, 9:30 AM

Modeling Li-ion Battery Temperature and Degredation

Ozark Room

An ideal battery model must gather sufficient electrochemical data about the battery system while remaining computationally efficient. To prevent failure from thermal runaway and protect the battery health, understanding the thermal characteristics of a battery throughout its lifespan is essential, particularly for 3D applications in a battery pack.

To achieve this, a single particle battery model was coupled with a 3D heat generation component to simulate the heat generation and 3D heat transfer in a cell. Mathematical modeling equations were used to predict the growth of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer, the primary contributor to degradation. This cell model was applied to a 6-cell pack to observe pack heat transfer during degradation.

To validate this model, a 6-cell battery pack was created and tested experimentally. From this experimental data, parameter estimation was performed to understand the composition of each cell. This pack was then recreated and simulated to provide a reference for the battery model.

The results indicate a parabolic SEI thickness growth when cycling. This resulted in non-linear capacity loss, and due to the corresponding increase in cell resistance from SEI growth, the heat generation increased as the battery degraded. The 3D pack temperature was highest at the center of the pack due to heat transfer with surrounding cells.