Title

Chalcogenide Nanomaterials as Biosensors

Department

Chemistry

Major

Chemistry

Research Advisor

Nath, Manashi

Advisor's Department

Chemistry

Funding Source

National Science Foundation & ACS Petroleum Research Fund

Abstract

Chalcogenide nanomaterials have recently been found to have various electrochemical properties that allow them to oxidize biomolecules such as uric acid, ascorbic acid, dopamine, and glucose. This direct oxidation process lets off electrons that allow such biomolecules to be detected and measured with high precision and accuracy. Producing these nanomaterials as electrochemical biosensors could have many benefits to the public including but not limited to reusability, a longer shelf life of the product than current enzyme-based biosensors, higher sensitivity, and possible integration into continuous health monitoring devices.

Biography

Megan Percy is a second year student at Missouri University of Science and Technology, majoring in Chemistry with an emphasis in Biochemistry, and pursuing a minor in Biomedical Engineering. She is originally from St. Peters, Missouri, and, in addition to conducting research under Dr. Manashi Nath, she is a member of the social sorority Zeta Tau Alpha, working for their philanthropy team as the Public Relations chairman.

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Proposal Oral Applicant

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Missouri Room

Presentation Date

14 Apr 2022, 11:00 am - 11:30 am

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Apr 14th, 11:00 AM Apr 14th, 11:30 AM

Chalcogenide Nanomaterials as Biosensors

Missouri Room

Chalcogenide nanomaterials have recently been found to have various electrochemical properties that allow them to oxidize biomolecules such as uric acid, ascorbic acid, dopamine, and glucose. This direct oxidation process lets off electrons that allow such biomolecules to be detected and measured with high precision and accuracy. Producing these nanomaterials as electrochemical biosensors could have many benefits to the public including but not limited to reusability, a longer shelf life of the product than current enzyme-based biosensors, higher sensitivity, and possible integration into continuous health monitoring devices.