Title

Assessing Nanoparticles Affects on Bacterial Cells

Presenter Information

Alex Daniels

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Science Secondary Education Emphasis

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Biology Department

Abstract

Ionic copper and silver (Cu2+ ~ 0.3 mg/L, and Ag+ ~ 0.02 mg/L) can be an effective, long-term approach for controlling bacterial infections in hospitals. Cu2+ and Ag+ treatments are low cost, easy to install and maintain, and the presence of the residual disinfectants throughout the system present potential for longterm lasting effects. CuO nanoparticles also exhibit good effectiveness in treating bacterial contamination. However, there are limited studies on the effect of Cu2+/Ag+ against bacteria and their mode of anti-bacterial activity. Together with the research group of Dr. Honglan Shi in the Missouri S&T Chemistry department, we have been using single particle (SP)-ICP-MS and single cell (SC)-ICP-MS to evaluate the effectiveness of silver and copper-based nanoparticles. To complement this research, we propose to construct biosensor strains of Escherichia coli that respond to various types of cell damage. This strategy has been employed to identify the mode of action of various antibiotics (reference Eltzov paper) and this work will be the first time such biosensors have been used to investigate the antibacterial properties of silver and copper nanoparticles.

Biography

Alex Daniels is a sophomore student in Biology education who has worked in the lab of Dr. Westenberg for the past year and a half. She came from a background of PLTW classes in high school, and has been developing further lab skills during her time at S&T. Alex enjoys working with bacteria and discovering their various roles and applications in medicine and is excited about this upcoming Fellows project.

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Proposal Oral Applicant

Document Type

Presentation

Award

2021-2022 OURE Fellows scholarship recipient

Presentation Date

29 Apr 2017, 9:15 am - 9:30 am

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Apr 29th, 9:15 AM Apr 29th, 9:30 AM

Assessing Nanoparticles Affects on Bacterial Cells

Ionic copper and silver (Cu2+ ~ 0.3 mg/L, and Ag+ ~ 0.02 mg/L) can be an effective, long-term approach for controlling bacterial infections in hospitals. Cu2+ and Ag+ treatments are low cost, easy to install and maintain, and the presence of the residual disinfectants throughout the system present potential for longterm lasting effects. CuO nanoparticles also exhibit good effectiveness in treating bacterial contamination. However, there are limited studies on the effect of Cu2+/Ag+ against bacteria and their mode of anti-bacterial activity. Together with the research group of Dr. Honglan Shi in the Missouri S&T Chemistry department, we have been using single particle (SP)-ICP-MS and single cell (SC)-ICP-MS to evaluate the effectiveness of silver and copper-based nanoparticles. To complement this research, we propose to construct biosensor strains of Escherichia coli that respond to various types of cell damage. This strategy has been employed to identify the mode of action of various antibiotics (reference Eltzov paper) and this work will be the first time such biosensors have been used to investigate the antibacterial properties of silver and copper nanoparticles.