Title

Missouri Naval Veterans in World War II

Presenter Information

Clinton Lawrence

Department

History and Political Science

Major

History

Research Advisor

Fogg, Shannon Lee

Advisor's Department

History and Political Science

Abstract

This presentation covers how World War II naval veterans, Missouri naval veterans specifically, viewed their enemy and their time at war. Their enemy largely being the people of Japan. Through this analysis people can see that the Missouri veterans in the Navy did not view the Japanese people with reckless hate as it has come to be believed. Rather, some viewed their enemy with a sense of caution and respect. Their are references to their honor and tenacity, as well as suspicion and distrust. By looking at the lives of sailors, crewmen, and marines on a more individual basis people can get a better since of how the war was viewed from their perspective.

Biography

Clinton Lawrence is a senior history major at the Missouri University of Science & Technology. His area of interest is the history of the Far East such as China, Japan, Korea, and the South Pacific. Clinton's grandfather, from Missouri served in the U.S. Navy during World War II on several vessels as a fire crewman. Clinton is an Eagle Scout and avid supporter of his community, where he has performed several public service projects.

Research Category

Arts and Humanities

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Ozark Room

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2019, 9:30 am - 10:00 am

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Apr 16th, 9:30 AM Apr 16th, 10:00 AM

Missouri Naval Veterans in World War II

Ozark Room

This presentation covers how World War II naval veterans, Missouri naval veterans specifically, viewed their enemy and their time at war. Their enemy largely being the people of Japan. Through this analysis people can see that the Missouri veterans in the Navy did not view the Japanese people with reckless hate as it has come to be believed. Rather, some viewed their enemy with a sense of caution and respect. Their are references to their honor and tenacity, as well as suspicion and distrust. By looking at the lives of sailors, crewmen, and marines on a more individual basis people can get a better since of how the war was viewed from their perspective.