Title

Breathing Measurement Improvements & Investigation

Presenter Information

Rhys Martin

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biology/Psychology

Research Advisor

Burns, Devin Michael

Advisor's Department

Psychological Science

Funding Source

Cognitive Science Lab Startup Funds, OURE, Out of Pocket

Abstract

Our team has built a breathing measurement device similar to a spirometer, but with special considerations for measuring breathing maneuvers at lower flow rates. It improves upon current tools with inexpensive and fully digital components, including a thermistor, microphone, and gas sensor. Currently, we are doing simple tests of instrument functionality in the experimental environment and will soon be using it to measure the effect of a controlled breathing session on a subject’s ability to steady the flow rate of their breath.

We would like expand our research and improve the prototype materials. Further experiments will include more generalized breath training in experimental groups, and invite subjects to return to the lab at repeat intervals for short term longitudinal studies. We may also pursue integration with posture sensors developed previously in the cognitive science lab. This will help us further investigate the effects of yoga and other Ayurvedic breathing disciplines. Improved materials may include metal, ceramic, or plastic castings� sealants and lubricants� and possibly new sensors.

Biography

Rhys Martin is an undergraduate student, finishing his Bachelor’s of Science degrees in Biology and Psychology. He is an personal trainer and a KMNR DJ, and a private tutor. He enjoys crosswords and card games.

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Proposal Oral Applicant

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Missouri Room

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2019, 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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Apr 16th, 1:00 PM Apr 16th, 1:30 PM

Breathing Measurement Improvements & Investigation

Missouri Room

Our team has built a breathing measurement device similar to a spirometer, but with special considerations for measuring breathing maneuvers at lower flow rates. It improves upon current tools with inexpensive and fully digital components, including a thermistor, microphone, and gas sensor. Currently, we are doing simple tests of instrument functionality in the experimental environment and will soon be using it to measure the effect of a controlled breathing session on a subject’s ability to steady the flow rate of their breath.

We would like expand our research and improve the prototype materials. Further experiments will include more generalized breath training in experimental groups, and invite subjects to return to the lab at repeat intervals for short term longitudinal studies. We may also pursue integration with posture sensors developed previously in the cognitive science lab. This will help us further investigate the effects of yoga and other Ayurvedic breathing disciplines. Improved materials may include metal, ceramic, or plastic castings� sealants and lubricants� and possibly new sensors.