Title

The Effect of IQG1 Phosphorylation

Presenter Information

Kristen Schwandtner

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences; Chemistry Minor

Research Advisor

Shannon, Katie

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

After a cell goes through mitosis or meiosis, a process called cytokinesis takes place. During cytokinesis the cytoplasm of the cell is divided between two daughter cells. Cytokinesis is a vital cellular process as it physically splits the components of the cell into two daughter cells. Budding yeast, like other eukaryotic cells, divides the cell membrane using an actomyosin contractile ring. In yeast cells, a protein known as IQG1 is required for the contraction of the actomyosin ring that divides the daughter cells. Phosphorylation mutations of IQG1 cause the actomyosin ring to form incorrectly. With IQG1 being essential to actomyosin, formation mutations cause defects in cytokinesis of yeast cells. My research will focus on the study of different phosphorylation mutations of IQG1 and their effects on binding to actin.

Biography

Kirsten Schwandtner is from Tebbetts, MO. She is a sophomore in Biological Sciences and is minoring in Chemistry. On campus she is involved in Phi Sigma Pi, Phi Sigma, and Scrubs. She is currently volunteering in Dr. Shannon's lab.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2019, 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

The Effect of IQG1 Phosphorylation

Upper Atrium

After a cell goes through mitosis or meiosis, a process called cytokinesis takes place. During cytokinesis the cytoplasm of the cell is divided between two daughter cells. Cytokinesis is a vital cellular process as it physically splits the components of the cell into two daughter cells. Budding yeast, like other eukaryotic cells, divides the cell membrane using an actomyosin contractile ring. In yeast cells, a protein known as IQG1 is required for the contraction of the actomyosin ring that divides the daughter cells. Phosphorylation mutations of IQG1 cause the actomyosin ring to form incorrectly. With IQG1 being essential to actomyosin, formation mutations cause defects in cytokinesis of yeast cells. My research will focus on the study of different phosphorylation mutations of IQG1 and their effects on binding to actin.