Title

3D Bioprinting Polymer Bioactive Glass Composite

Presenter Information

Michael Khayat

Department

Materials Science and Engineering

Major

Ceramic Engineering

Research Advisor

Convertine, Anthony J.

Advisor's Department

Materials Science and Engineering

Funding Source

IAM

Abstract

In traditional tissue engineering, 3D-printed scaffolds are prepared, and then cells are seeded on them. However, these cells typically proliferate on the outer surface of the scaffold, making it difficult for them to grow. However, in bioprinting, both materials and cells are printed together to form a 3D environment. Bioglass polymer composite scaffolds (biodegradable) are printed alongside hydrogels containing stem cells using solvent-based extrusion printing. These scaffolds are tested in vivo and in vitro to observe osteoconductive, angiogenic, and mechanical properties, to be used for drug-testing protocols.

Biography

Michael Khayat is a Junior studying ceramic engineering with a minor in biomedical engineering at Missouri S&T. He is the standing Longboard Club President, the Programming chair for Material Advantage, a member a Keramos, a Transfer Transitions mentor, teaches music lessons at the Kaleidoscope Learning Center, and is heavily involved in multiple research projects on campus. He has been conducting research at S&T since his freshman year.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2019, 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

3D Bioprinting Polymer Bioactive Glass Composite

Upper Atrium

In traditional tissue engineering, 3D-printed scaffolds are prepared, and then cells are seeded on them. However, these cells typically proliferate on the outer surface of the scaffold, making it difficult for them to grow. However, in bioprinting, both materials and cells are printed together to form a 3D environment. Bioglass polymer composite scaffolds (biodegradable) are printed alongside hydrogels containing stem cells using solvent-based extrusion printing. These scaffolds are tested in vivo and in vitro to observe osteoconductive, angiogenic, and mechanical properties, to be used for drug-testing protocols.