Title

Effects of mutant Dbf2 alleles on cytokinesis

Presenter Information

Sarah Darknell

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Shannon, Katie

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

FYRE

Abstract

Cytokinesis is the division of one cell into two daughter cells. Budding yeast, like other eukaryotic cells, uses an actomyosin contractile ring (AMR) to accomplish cytokinesis. The coordination of cytokinesis with chromosome separation in mitosis is essential to prevent aneuploidy. In budding yeast, the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) is responsible for completing cytokinesis and linking it to the end of mitosis. Dbf2 is a protein kinase of the MEN that regulates AMR function through phosphorylation. Dbf2 activity is itself regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation by other MEN proteins. In my project, mutant dbf2 alleles that prevent regulation are incorporated into the yeast genome. The effects of the mutations on protein localization and myosin contraction will be observed by fluorescence microscopy. As Dbf2 has a human homolog that is a tumor suppressor gene, learning about the function of this gene could help to illuminate its role in cancer development.

Biography

Sarah Darknell is a sophomore majoring in Biological Sciences and minoring in Psychology and Chemistry. She is a participant of First Year Research Experience (FYRE) and is being mentored by Dr. Katie Shannon while working in the cytokinesis laboratory. She is also the Outreach Chair for SCRUBs pre-health society, and an active volunteer at Phelps Health. She hopes to get into Medical School and pursue a career as a physician.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2019, 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

Effects of mutant Dbf2 alleles on cytokinesis

Upper Atrium

Cytokinesis is the division of one cell into two daughter cells. Budding yeast, like other eukaryotic cells, uses an actomyosin contractile ring (AMR) to accomplish cytokinesis. The coordination of cytokinesis with chromosome separation in mitosis is essential to prevent aneuploidy. In budding yeast, the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) is responsible for completing cytokinesis and linking it to the end of mitosis. Dbf2 is a protein kinase of the MEN that regulates AMR function through phosphorylation. Dbf2 activity is itself regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation by other MEN proteins. In my project, mutant dbf2 alleles that prevent regulation are incorporated into the yeast genome. The effects of the mutations on protein localization and myosin contraction will be observed by fluorescence microscopy. As Dbf2 has a human homolog that is a tumor suppressor gene, learning about the function of this gene could help to illuminate its role in cancer development.