Title

Quantification of Hydration in Drosphila Melanogaster

Presenter Information

Sarah Buckley

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Thimgan, Matthew S.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

UM Research Board & Missouri S&T OURE

Abstract

In research labs using Drosophila, most commonly the source of food and water is the same. This could pose problems in that if the fly is not hungry, it may become dehydrated or vice versa in that the fly may become oversaturated. To combat this problem, a variety of 3D printed caps were placed over the fly rearing vial and a humidity and temperature sensor was used to evaluate the efficacy of the cap. Hemolymph provides the most information on the hydration of flies, but there currently is no standardized collection method. Trying to solve this problem led to the construction of a device that uses airflow and pressure to manipulate adult flies and extract hemolymph samples. To record the amount of hemolymph extracted, the hemolymph drop gets transferred to hydrated paraffin oil. A picture is taken of the hemolymph droplet in the oil and a volume calculation is performed.

Biography

Sarah is a senior from Richland, MO. She is studying Biological Sciences with an emphasis of Pre-Med and a minor in Chemistry. On campus, Sarah is a Student Ambassador for the Admissions office, a member of Scrubs Pre-Health Group, an Honors Academy student, and she is currently working in Dr. Thimgan’s Fly Lab.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2019, 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

Quantification of Hydration in Drosphila Melanogaster

Upper Atrium

In research labs using Drosophila, most commonly the source of food and water is the same. This could pose problems in that if the fly is not hungry, it may become dehydrated or vice versa in that the fly may become oversaturated. To combat this problem, a variety of 3D printed caps were placed over the fly rearing vial and a humidity and temperature sensor was used to evaluate the efficacy of the cap. Hemolymph provides the most information on the hydration of flies, but there currently is no standardized collection method. Trying to solve this problem led to the construction of a device that uses airflow and pressure to manipulate adult flies and extract hemolymph samples. To record the amount of hemolymph extracted, the hemolymph drop gets transferred to hydrated paraffin oil. A picture is taken of the hemolymph droplet in the oil and a volume calculation is performed.