Title

Resident-Time Distributions for Trickle Bed Reactors

Presenter Information

Kayla Bruemmer

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Biochemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Shariff, Humayun

Advisor's Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Abstract

Trickle Bed Reactor (TBR) is one of the common types of reactor used in the chemical industry. For this project, the Residence Time Distributions (RTD) for a lab scale packed bed reactor with trickling flow (downflow) were studied using liquid tracer experiments for two shapes of commercial catalysts, spherical and cylindrical. The reactor was packed with porous catalyst particles in the center with inert glass beads packed on top and bottom. The RTD was then found from conductivity measurements using pulse-input liquid-tracer injection. Different liquid and gas velocities were used to compare the data. From these, the mean residence time and standard deviation were determined from the C-curve. The liquid hold-up of the reactor was evaluated using the mean residence time to compare between the catylysts.

Biography

Kayla Bruemmer is a Junior in the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering. Her home town is Fair Grove, MO, just north of Springfield, MO. She loves Running, Hunting, and Fishing. For the summer of 2019, she will be interning at Mother's Brewery in Springfield, MO and working on her farm.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Engineering poster session, Third place

Location

Upper Atrium

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2019, 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

Resident-Time Distributions for Trickle Bed Reactors

Upper Atrium

Trickle Bed Reactor (TBR) is one of the common types of reactor used in the chemical industry. For this project, the Residence Time Distributions (RTD) for a lab scale packed bed reactor with trickling flow (downflow) were studied using liquid tracer experiments for two shapes of commercial catalysts, spherical and cylindrical. The reactor was packed with porous catalyst particles in the center with inert glass beads packed on top and bottom. The RTD was then found from conductivity measurements using pulse-input liquid-tracer injection. Different liquid and gas velocities were used to compare the data. From these, the mean residence time and standard deviation were determined from the C-curve. The liquid hold-up of the reactor was evaluated using the mean residence time to compare between the catylysts.