Title

Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Bioactive Glass Fibers Increase Wound Healing

Presenter Information

Lisa Gutgesell

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Semon, Julie A.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Seed Grant from Biomedical Science and Engineering

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to accelerate wound closure, improve epidermal/dermal architecture, and improve vascular dysregulation. Borate bioactive glass fibers has also successively treated chronic, nonhealing dermal wounds in the clinic. This study analyzes borate bioactive glass activated MSCs and phenotypic alterations. When cocultured with bioactive glass, MSCs have also shown the ability to accelerate wound repair and improve cutaneous architecture while improving vascularity. MSCs in the presence of glass are evaluated for cell growth, differentiation, migration, and invasion. The hypothesis is borate bioactive glass triggers phenotypic changes in MSCs to increase wound healing.

Biography

Lisa Gutgesell is a senior majoring in Biological Science and minoring in Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering. She will be pursuing a PhD in cellular biology.

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Final Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

2016-2017 OURE Fellows recipient

Location

Turner Room

Presentation Date

17 Apr 2018, 9:30 am - 10:00 am

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Apr 17th, 9:30 AM Apr 17th, 10:00 AM

Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Bioactive Glass Fibers Increase Wound Healing

Turner Room

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to accelerate wound closure, improve epidermal/dermal architecture, and improve vascular dysregulation. Borate bioactive glass fibers has also successively treated chronic, nonhealing dermal wounds in the clinic. This study analyzes borate bioactive glass activated MSCs and phenotypic alterations. When cocultured with bioactive glass, MSCs have also shown the ability to accelerate wound repair and improve cutaneous architecture while improving vascularity. MSCs in the presence of glass are evaluated for cell growth, differentiation, migration, and invasion. The hypothesis is borate bioactive glass triggers phenotypic changes in MSCs to increase wound healing.