Title

Solvent Based 3D Printing of Biopolymer/Bioactive Glass Composite and Hydrogel for Tissue Engineering Applications

Presenter Information

Jakeb Baldridge

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Semon, Julie A.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is an emerging technology in which scaffolding materials and cell-laden hydrogels may be deposited in a predetermined fashion to create 3D porous constructs. A major challenge in 3D bioprinting is the slow degradation of melt deposited biopolymer. In this research, we describe a new method for printing poly-caprolactone (PCL)/bioactive borate glass composite as a scaffolding material and Pluronic F127 hydrogel as a cell suspension medium. Bioactive borate glass was added to a mixture of PCL and organic solvent to make an extrudable paste using one syringe while hydrogel was extruded and deposited in between the PCL/borate glass filaments using a second syringe. The degradation of the PCL/borate glass composite scaffold with and without the presence of hydrogel was investigated by soaking the scaffold in minimum essential medium. The weight loss of the scaffold together with formation of a hydroxyapatite-like layer on the surface shows the excellent bioactivity of the scaffold.

Biography

Jakeb Baldridge is graduating in May of 2018 with a (bio)chemical engineering degree. He has done undergraduate research for two years under Dr. Semon, had an REU at Oklahoma State, and had an internship at Bayer CropScience.

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Final Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Turner Room

Presentation Date

17 Apr 2018, 9:00 am - 9:30 am

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Apr 17th, 9:00 AM Apr 17th, 9:30 AM

Solvent Based 3D Printing of Biopolymer/Bioactive Glass Composite and Hydrogel for Tissue Engineering Applications

Turner Room

Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is an emerging technology in which scaffolding materials and cell-laden hydrogels may be deposited in a predetermined fashion to create 3D porous constructs. A major challenge in 3D bioprinting is the slow degradation of melt deposited biopolymer. In this research, we describe a new method for printing poly-caprolactone (PCL)/bioactive borate glass composite as a scaffolding material and Pluronic F127 hydrogel as a cell suspension medium. Bioactive borate glass was added to a mixture of PCL and organic solvent to make an extrudable paste using one syringe while hydrogel was extruded and deposited in between the PCL/borate glass filaments using a second syringe. The degradation of the PCL/borate glass composite scaffold with and without the presence of hydrogel was investigated by soaking the scaffold in minimum essential medium. The weight loss of the scaffold together with formation of a hydroxyapatite-like layer on the surface shows the excellent bioactivity of the scaffold.