Title

Investigation of the Circulation of Helium in the Prismatic Modular Reactor

Presenter Information

Christopher Mark

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Usman, Shoaib
Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H.

Advisor's Department

Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Science

Second Advisor's Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Funding Source

U.S. Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (DOE-NERI) project (NEUP 13- 4953 (DENE0000744)

Abstract

The prismatic modular reactor (PMR) is one of the leading designs for the next generation of nuclear reactors because of its ability to passively remove heat by convection in an accident scenario. It is important to understand how the coolant, helium, circulates in order to design reactors that safely shutdown in the event of a loss of coolant flow accident. We studied the effect of the outer surface temperature of the reactor vessel on the circulation of the helium and the transfer of heat within the reactor. A scaled down duel-channel facility was used to study the plenum-to-plenum circulation. Data was taken with one channel heated, and the other channel and the upper plenum cooled to different temperatures. The temperature and heat flux was measured at several points along the channels.

Biography

Christopher Mark is a sophomore student majoring in Chemical Engineering from Manchester Missouri. He is currently doing undergraduate research with graduate student Salman Alshehri.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium

Presentation Date

17 Apr 2018, 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Comments

Joint project with Salman M. Alshehri (Ph.D. Candidate)

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 17th, 1:00 PM Apr 17th, 4:00 PM

Investigation of the Circulation of Helium in the Prismatic Modular Reactor

Upper Atrium

The prismatic modular reactor (PMR) is one of the leading designs for the next generation of nuclear reactors because of its ability to passively remove heat by convection in an accident scenario. It is important to understand how the coolant, helium, circulates in order to design reactors that safely shutdown in the event of a loss of coolant flow accident. We studied the effect of the outer surface temperature of the reactor vessel on the circulation of the helium and the transfer of heat within the reactor. A scaled down duel-channel facility was used to study the plenum-to-plenum circulation. Data was taken with one channel heated, and the other channel and the upper plenum cooled to different temperatures. The temperature and heat flux was measured at several points along the channels.