Title

E. coli Survivorship

Presenter Information

Jonah Heitman
Veronica Lee

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Niyogi, Dev

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

OURE

Abstract

E. coli bacteria are used as indicators to detect the presence of harmful microorganisms in environmental samples. We are examining E. coli concentrations in local streams, where it is crucial to understand the conditions in whichE. coli persist in a freshwater environment. We devised several microcosm experiments using experimental streams in order to better understand controls on E. coli survival. Several experiments tested temperature and sunlight effects on the survival of E. coli. Survival was much lower in full sun and at warmer temperatures. Another experiment tested the effects of streambed sediments on suspended E. coli. This included several trials of experimental streams filled with sand, gravel, and devoid of any sediment as a control. The E. coli seem to behave as predicted, acting more as particles themselves, and the counts for sand gutters were lowest, with the gravel behind it, and the highest counts yielding from the control.

Biography

Jonah Heitman, a driven student, was fascinated in his Ecology class. Instantly, he decided to jump on board Dr. Niyogi’s lab and fell in love with the stream system of Mill Creek.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Carver Room

Start Date

4-11-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

4-11-2017 11:20 AM

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Apr 11th, 11:00 AM Apr 11th, 11:20 AM

E. coli Survivorship

Carver Room

E. coli bacteria are used as indicators to detect the presence of harmful microorganisms in environmental samples. We are examining E. coli concentrations in local streams, where it is crucial to understand the conditions in whichE. coli persist in a freshwater environment. We devised several microcosm experiments using experimental streams in order to better understand controls on E. coli survival. Several experiments tested temperature and sunlight effects on the survival of E. coli. Survival was much lower in full sun and at warmer temperatures. Another experiment tested the effects of streambed sediments on suspended E. coli. This included several trials of experimental streams filled with sand, gravel, and devoid of any sediment as a control. The E. coli seem to behave as predicted, acting more as particles themselves, and the counts for sand gutters were lowest, with the gravel behind it, and the highest counts yielding from the control.