Title

Detectable Biosensing Processes in Arabidopsis

Presenter Information

Erin Nischwitz

Department

Chemistry

Major

Chemistry

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Opportunity for Undergraduate Research Experience (OURE) Fellows Program

Abstract

Plants’ advanced ability to sense and respond to a variety of biological triggers could possibly be harnessed to make an easily contained biosensor with the possibility of more obvious and accurate reporting than those readily available to the average consumer. Their property of uptaking and accumulating chemicals over time could prove useful in sensing pollutants plants are exposed to consistently and at low concentrations over time. Though a plant may have collected chemicals, this signal will not be easily recognizable by humans without aid, undermining a plant’s perceived ability as a detector. This project focuses on developing a genetic circuit to trigger an easily detectable reporter in response to contaminants using a model plant. Possible reporters include a degreening process to lessen chlorophyll in leaves combined with the cell’s creation of a chromoprotein or the production of a fluorescent protein visible under blacklight. A pre existing cytokinin system in the cells can be used to test the success of the system dependent upon which reporter is chosen.

Biography

Erin Nischwitz is a sophomore majoring in Chemistry with an emphasis in pre-med and minors in Biological Sciences and Cognitive Neuroscience. She is currently the President of Internationally Genetically Engineered Machine Team, the Sisterhood Chair for Omega Sigma Service Sorority, and the Public Relations Chair for Helix Life Sciences. She intends to continue her education by attending medical school.

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Proposal Oral Applicant

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Turner Room

Start Date

4-11-2017 1:40 PM

End Date

4-11-2017 2:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 1:40 PM Apr 11th, 2:00 PM

Detectable Biosensing Processes in Arabidopsis

Turner Room

Plants’ advanced ability to sense and respond to a variety of biological triggers could possibly be harnessed to make an easily contained biosensor with the possibility of more obvious and accurate reporting than those readily available to the average consumer. Their property of uptaking and accumulating chemicals over time could prove useful in sensing pollutants plants are exposed to consistently and at low concentrations over time. Though a plant may have collected chemicals, this signal will not be easily recognizable by humans without aid, undermining a plant’s perceived ability as a detector. This project focuses on developing a genetic circuit to trigger an easily detectable reporter in response to contaminants using a model plant. Possible reporters include a degreening process to lessen chlorophyll in leaves combined with the cell’s creation of a chromoprotein or the production of a fluorescent protein visible under blacklight. A pre existing cytokinin system in the cells can be used to test the success of the system dependent upon which reporter is chosen.