Title

Healthy and Diabetic Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Bioactive Glass Fibers Increase Angiogenesis

Presenter Information

Lisa Gutgesell

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Semon, Julie A.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

Diabetes affects almost ten percent of the United States Population. As a disease that dimishes the bodies ability to repair itself, being able to affectively treat the diabetic population’s wounds would help the quality of life for diabetic patients. Recently, a primed population of MSCs (MSC2) has demonstrated a more uniform, anti-inflammatory phenotype than the unprimed, heterogenous MSCs, while maintaining the capacity for differentiation, homing, and cytokine secretion. When co-cultured with bioactive glass, MSCs have also shown the ability to accelerate wound repair and improce cutaneous architecture while improving vascular. This proposal will compare MSCs from a healthy population to MSCs from a diabetic population. It will also evaluate the effects of co-culturing bioactive glass microfiber scaffolds (BG scaffolds) and MSCS. This will show examine how MSCs from a healthy population act with the BG verses how unhealthy MSCs act and if there is a difference in how successful either MSCs is at treating chronic, nonhealing dermal wounds. This proposal will test the hypothesis that bioglass activates MSCs and alters their phenotype to increase wound healing. The work in this proposal will begin by optimizing the conditions for the co-administration of MSCs and BG scaffold. In the subsequent experiments, the homing and angiogenic capacity will be evaluated.

Aim 1: Evaluate phenotypic of healthy MSCs and unhealthy MSCs in vitro.
This aim will compare healthy human MSCs with diabetic MSCS. Cells will be grown under standard culture conditions. The cells will be grown to ~70% and then the cells will be lifted with trypsin/EDTA . They will be analyzed for cell growth, colony forming units, viability, differential potential, cell surface antigen expression, and extracellular matrix deposition.

Aim 2: Evaluate phenotypic changes in both MSCs populations co-cultured with BG scaffold i>in vitro.
This aim will compare human MSCs co-cultured with bioglass to MSCs grown under standard conditions. Cells will be grown under standard culture conditions. After 7-9 days from initial plating, when MSCs typically become ~70% confluent, bioglass will be added to cultures. The next day, cells will be lifted with trypsin/EDTA and analyzed for cell growth, colony forming units, viability, differential potential, cell surface antigen expression, and extracellular matrix deposition.

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Proposal Oral Applicant

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Turner Room

Start Date

4-11-2017 10:20 AM

End Date

4-11-2017 10:40 AM

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Apr 11th, 10:20 AM Apr 11th, 10:40 AM

Healthy and Diabetic Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Bioactive Glass Fibers Increase Angiogenesis

Turner Room

Diabetes affects almost ten percent of the United States Population. As a disease that dimishes the bodies ability to repair itself, being able to affectively treat the diabetic population’s wounds would help the quality of life for diabetic patients. Recently, a primed population of MSCs (MSC2) has demonstrated a more uniform, anti-inflammatory phenotype than the unprimed, heterogenous MSCs, while maintaining the capacity for differentiation, homing, and cytokine secretion. When co-cultured with bioactive glass, MSCs have also shown the ability to accelerate wound repair and improce cutaneous architecture while improving vascular. This proposal will compare MSCs from a healthy population to MSCs from a diabetic population. It will also evaluate the effects of co-culturing bioactive glass microfiber scaffolds (BG scaffolds) and MSCS. This will show examine how MSCs from a healthy population act with the BG verses how unhealthy MSCs act and if there is a difference in how successful either MSCs is at treating chronic, nonhealing dermal wounds. This proposal will test the hypothesis that bioglass activates MSCs and alters their phenotype to increase wound healing. The work in this proposal will begin by optimizing the conditions for the co-administration of MSCs and BG scaffold. In the subsequent experiments, the homing and angiogenic capacity will be evaluated.

Aim 1: Evaluate phenotypic of healthy MSCs and unhealthy MSCs in vitro.
This aim will compare healthy human MSCs with diabetic MSCS. Cells will be grown under standard culture conditions. The cells will be grown to ~70% and then the cells will be lifted with trypsin/EDTA . They will be analyzed for cell growth, colony forming units, viability, differential potential, cell surface antigen expression, and extracellular matrix deposition.

Aim 2: Evaluate phenotypic changes in both MSCs populations co-cultured with BG scaffold i>in vitro.
This aim will compare human MSCs co-cultured with bioglass to MSCs grown under standard conditions. Cells will be grown under standard culture conditions. After 7-9 days from initial plating, when MSCs typically become ~70% confluent, bioglass will be added to cultures. The next day, cells will be lifted with trypsin/EDTA and analyzed for cell growth, colony forming units, viability, differential potential, cell surface antigen expression, and extracellular matrix deposition.