Title

A novel approach of 3D bioprinting using uncultured stem cells and bioactive glass

Presenter Information

Jakeb Baldridge

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Biochemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Semon, Julie A.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

The primary research objective of this project is to investigate the ability of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) and bioactive borate glass (B3 glass) to collectively repair tissues requiring high vascularization. The research is also expected to generate a novel technique of solvent-based extrusion of a unique B3 glass and uncultured AD-MSCs to produce a vascularized scaffold by 3D printing. The proposed research will investigate the 3D printing of AD-MSCs with pluronic P-127 hydrogel and polycaprolactone (PCL)/bioactive glass composite in a single process. This will generate new knowledge on the role of uncultured AD-MSCs and B3 glass in vascularization. The long-term practical objective of this research is to produce a reproducible, cellularized scaffold that could be used to repair highly vascularized tissues such as kidney, skin, bone, and cardiac tissue.

After scaffold fabrication, tests will include a long-term degradation analysis of the hydrogel and polymer-glass composite in a simulated body fluid, its bioactivity, and mechanical assessment of the scaffold. The tests will be followed by in vitro assessment including cell viability, differentiation to endothelium and bone, and AD-MSCs deposition of extra cellular matrix in a 3D environment. Finally, we propose a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay to investigate the vascular network formation in the 3D bioprinted scaffold as it provides an excellent model system to quantify the blood vessel formation and growth.

Biography

Jakeb Baldridge is a Junior in chemical engineering with a biology emphasis and will be graduating in May of 2018. He is currently the fundraising and public relations officer of ChemE Car, vice-president of Order of Omega, an active member of Sigma Nu fraternity, and currently in his third semester of undergraduate research. Jakeb joined Dr. Semon’s research team at the end of the fall 2015. He also spent the summer of 2016 working for Dr. Jim Smay at Oklahoma State University where he worked on building a commercial 3D printer, which prints multiple materials at once.

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Proposal Oral Applicant

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Turner Room

Start Date

4-11-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

4-11-2017 9:20 AM

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Apr 11th, 9:00 AM Apr 11th, 9:20 AM

A novel approach of 3D bioprinting using uncultured stem cells and bioactive glass

Turner Room

The primary research objective of this project is to investigate the ability of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) and bioactive borate glass (B3 glass) to collectively repair tissues requiring high vascularization. The research is also expected to generate a novel technique of solvent-based extrusion of a unique B3 glass and uncultured AD-MSCs to produce a vascularized scaffold by 3D printing. The proposed research will investigate the 3D printing of AD-MSCs with pluronic P-127 hydrogel and polycaprolactone (PCL)/bioactive glass composite in a single process. This will generate new knowledge on the role of uncultured AD-MSCs and B3 glass in vascularization. The long-term practical objective of this research is to produce a reproducible, cellularized scaffold that could be used to repair highly vascularized tissues such as kidney, skin, bone, and cardiac tissue.

After scaffold fabrication, tests will include a long-term degradation analysis of the hydrogel and polymer-glass composite in a simulated body fluid, its bioactivity, and mechanical assessment of the scaffold. The tests will be followed by in vitro assessment including cell viability, differentiation to endothelium and bone, and AD-MSCs deposition of extra cellular matrix in a 3D environment. Finally, we propose a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay to investigate the vascular network formation in the 3D bioprinted scaffold as it provides an excellent model system to quantify the blood vessel formation and growth.