Title

Altering the Behavior of Flies Using Optogenetics

Presenter Information

Gregory Evans
Madison Morris

Department

Chemistry

Major

BioChemical Engineer

Research Advisor

Thimgan, Matthew S.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

Our project aims to modify sleep and wake behavior of flies through stimulation of a light-activated channel inserted into specific neurons, known as optogenetics. Flies expressing this channel in sleep and wake regulating cells were exposed to an activating light using an automated program on a Raspberry Pi developed by students in electrical engineering. We first recorded baseline sleep characteristics of these specific genotypes. We then exposed the animals to optogenetic stimulation, which altered their sleep and wake patterns. Our data are consistent with these cells being involved in sleep and wake regulation. Thus, we have successfully adapted optogenetic techniques to identify cells in sleep and wakefulness. Next, we will test flies expressing the channel in unique cells to determine if they are involved with sleep and wakefulness.

Biography

Gregory Evansis a senior biochemical major at Missouri S&T with a biomedical minor. He is a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, and plans on getting a master in biomedical dngineering.

Madison Morris is a Junior Biology major at Missouri S&T with a chemistry and history minor. She plays college soccer for the Lady Miners, is a member of Zeta Tau Alpha, and plans to attend medical school after graduation.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Start Date

4-11-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

4-11-2017 11:45 AM

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Apr 11th, 9:00 AM Apr 11th, 11:45 AM

Altering the Behavior of Flies Using Optogenetics

Upper Atrium/Hall

Our project aims to modify sleep and wake behavior of flies through stimulation of a light-activated channel inserted into specific neurons, known as optogenetics. Flies expressing this channel in sleep and wake regulating cells were exposed to an activating light using an automated program on a Raspberry Pi developed by students in electrical engineering. We first recorded baseline sleep characteristics of these specific genotypes. We then exposed the animals to optogenetic stimulation, which altered their sleep and wake patterns. Our data are consistent with these cells being involved in sleep and wake regulation. Thus, we have successfully adapted optogenetic techniques to identify cells in sleep and wakefulness. Next, we will test flies expressing the channel in unique cells to determine if they are involved with sleep and wakefulness.