Title

Generic Mutation in the Eighteenth Century

Presenter Information

Isabelle Kersting

Department

English and Technical Communication

Research Advisor

Schneider, Rachel M.

Advisor's Department

English and Technical Communication

Funding Source

FYRE program

Abstract

Eighteenth-century fragments can be a real can of worms. The contents can be completely unexpected and tricky at times. The mixture can be satirical and religious without the reader even realizing. Some works are labeled fragments, but it’s not clear why. Fragments are intriguing in their odd writing style, their openness to interpretation, and the symbols or annotations on the pages. In pursuing these curiosities, we have begun to create a database of eighteenth-century fragments which we have and will continue to study. This database will allow for the expansion of fragments into the digital humanities, give the public access, and facilitate further research in the area by students, teachers, and any individual seeking to educate themselves further on the subject. In establishing this database, we as researchers will make it possible for others to continue or build upon the foundation that we have created

Biography

Isabelle Kersting is a transfer student this year at Missouri S&T. She is from Flint Hill, Missouri and is a graduate of Troy Buchanan High. She is now enrolled in the teacher education program and will receive a BA in English in addition to her certification to teach at the secondary level once she graduates in 2019. She is also an active member of Zeta Tau Alpha, Junior Panhellenic Council, and Student Missouri State Teachers Association, in addition to being one of the First Year Research Experience student.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Start Date

4-11-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

4-11-2017 3:00 PM

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Apr 11th, 1:00 PM Apr 11th, 3:00 PM

Generic Mutation in the Eighteenth Century

Upper Atrium/Hall

Eighteenth-century fragments can be a real can of worms. The contents can be completely unexpected and tricky at times. The mixture can be satirical and religious without the reader even realizing. Some works are labeled fragments, but it’s not clear why. Fragments are intriguing in their odd writing style, their openness to interpretation, and the symbols or annotations on the pages. In pursuing these curiosities, we have begun to create a database of eighteenth-century fragments which we have and will continue to study. This database will allow for the expansion of fragments into the digital humanities, give the public access, and facilitate further research in the area by students, teachers, and any individual seeking to educate themselves further on the subject. In establishing this database, we as researchers will make it possible for others to continue or build upon the foundation that we have created