Title

Cellular Hitchhiking on Microparticles to Alleviate Skin Injury

Presenter Information

Chase Herman

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Barua, Sutapa

Advisor's Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Funding Source

Missouri S&T OURE, principal investigator’s start-up, and the University of Missouri Research Board Award

Abstract

Regenerative medicine holds great potential for the treatment of tissue damage. However, there are currently very few clinical applications of cell-based therapies; numerous studies have encountered complications with keeping transplant cells alive. To overcome this, the present study focuses on engineering polymer microparticles. These microparticles may provide the following: mechanical support for adherent cells in suspension, a means of culturing enormous amounts of cells in small volumes, and receptor-ligand specific signal mediated cell growth.

In this study, a simple flow-focusing device was developed to synthesize poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles with the solvent diffusion method. Particle diameters of approximately 200 μm were achieved. Additionally, particle surface chemistry was modified to promote cell adhesion, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured with these particles in suspension. We call this “cellular hitchhiking”. The specific goal of this research is treatment of skin injury, but the technique has versatile tissue regeneration applications.

Biography

Chase Herman is a 3rd-year undergraduate student from the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at Missouri S&T. Since his middle school days, he has enthusiastically participated in many research and design projects. During high school he competed in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) and was privileged to personally meet Robert Horvitz, a Nobel laureate. Listening to Dr. Horvitz and other laureates ignited Chase’s excitement for scientific research.

Since high school, Chase has worked in multiple research labs, both in academia and industry. This summer he will be participating in the National Science Foundation’s Research Experience for Undergraduate program (NSF-REU) at the University of Delaware. He hopes to graduate in May of 2018 and then pursue doctoral studies.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Missouri Room

Start Date

4-11-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

4-11-2017 11:00 AM

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Apr 11th, 10:30 AM Apr 11th, 11:00 AM

Cellular Hitchhiking on Microparticles to Alleviate Skin Injury

Missouri Room

Regenerative medicine holds great potential for the treatment of tissue damage. However, there are currently very few clinical applications of cell-based therapies; numerous studies have encountered complications with keeping transplant cells alive. To overcome this, the present study focuses on engineering polymer microparticles. These microparticles may provide the following: mechanical support for adherent cells in suspension, a means of culturing enormous amounts of cells in small volumes, and receptor-ligand specific signal mediated cell growth.

In this study, a simple flow-focusing device was developed to synthesize poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles with the solvent diffusion method. Particle diameters of approximately 200 μm were achieved. Additionally, particle surface chemistry was modified to promote cell adhesion, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured with these particles in suspension. We call this “cellular hitchhiking”. The specific goal of this research is treatment of skin injury, but the technique has versatile tissue regeneration applications.