Title

The Effects of Detonation Wave Collisions on Rock Throw

Presenter Information

Patrick Cahill

Department

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Major

Mining Engineering/Geology and Geophysics

Research Advisor

Johnson, Catherine E.

Advisor's Department

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Funding Source

Travel grant from DYNO Consult

Abstract

Rock blasting is the primary method used to break rock for excavation. It serves two purposes; fragmenting the rock and throwing it to its muck pile using explosive energy. Fragmentation and throw needs are site specific, dependent on end-product requirements. Prior studies have shown that by only changing blast hole timing with the same blast design, fragmentation and throw alters. In an operating mine in Georgia, an optimum inter-hole delay for fragmentation has been found by studying timings from 0ms to 45ms. Instantaneous timing between holes increased the throw by over 100 ft, but fragmentation was poor. Shock and detonation wave collision is a potential reason for this increased throw. This paper investigates this optimized inter-hole timing while altering top and bottom column primer time to potentially improve throw while maintaining optimum fragmentation. Timings studied are top initiation, bottom initiation, and top and bottom simultaneously.

Biography

Patrick Cahill is a senior in the Mining Engineering Department, and is an active member in the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration (of which he is currently serving as the S&T Chapter Treasurer), the International Society of Explosives Engineers, and the National Stone, Sand, and Gravel Association. He has performed undergraduate research in the Energetics Research Facility under the directorship of Dr. Catherine Johnson, Assistant Professor of Mining Engineering. Publications include “The Effects of Detonation Wave Collisions on Rock Throw”, which was presented at the proceedings of the 2017 Annual SME Conference in Denver; and “Missouri S&T Mine Expansion and Associated Risk Safety Analysis”, which was presented at the proceedings of the 43rd Annual Conference on Explosives and Blasting Techniques in Orlando. Patrick plans to work in the mining industry after graduation and would eventually like to return to S&T for a master’s degree in Explosives Engineering.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Missouri Room

Start Date

4-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

4-11-2017 10:30 AM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 10:00 AM Apr 11th, 10:30 AM

The Effects of Detonation Wave Collisions on Rock Throw

Missouri Room

Rock blasting is the primary method used to break rock for excavation. It serves two purposes; fragmenting the rock and throwing it to its muck pile using explosive energy. Fragmentation and throw needs are site specific, dependent on end-product requirements. Prior studies have shown that by only changing blast hole timing with the same blast design, fragmentation and throw alters. In an operating mine in Georgia, an optimum inter-hole delay for fragmentation has been found by studying timings from 0ms to 45ms. Instantaneous timing between holes increased the throw by over 100 ft, but fragmentation was poor. Shock and detonation wave collision is a potential reason for this increased throw. This paper investigates this optimized inter-hole timing while altering top and bottom column primer time to potentially improve throw while maintaining optimum fragmentation. Timings studied are top initiation, bottom initiation, and top and bottom simultaneously.