Title

Effects of Phosphorylation on Dbf2

Presenter Information

Alexander Ayres

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Shannon, Katie

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

OURE

Abstract

Cytokinesis is the physical process of cell division, which divides the cytoplasm between the two new daughter cells. One important pathway that regulates cytokinesis is called the Mitotic Exit Network, or MEN for short. The MEN is a signaling pathway that allows a dividing cell to complete cytokinesis and exit mitosis. To study cytokinetic defects, budding yeast is used a model organism. Of interest is the regulation of Dbf2, a MEN protein, by phosphorylation. Mutant alleles of the dbf2 gene that prevent phosphorylation or dephosphorylation have been created on a plasmid. The plasmid is duplicated and purified from bacterial cells, then inserted in yeast cells. After growth of the yeast colonies, the cells with Dbf2 mutations can be observed during mitosis through use of fluorescence microscopy to determine the effects of the mutations on cytokinesis.

Biography

Alex Ayres is currently in his 4th year at Missouri University of Science and Technology and plans on graduating in December with a degree in Chemical Engineer, minoring in Biology. For the last 3 years he has performed research on Cytokinesis in budding yeast under the guidance of Dr. Katie Shannon. After graduating, he plans on attending graduate school, and hopes to receive a Phd in Medical Microbiology.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Carver Room

Start Date

4-11-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

4-11-2017 9:20 AM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 9:00 AM Apr 11th, 9:20 AM

Effects of Phosphorylation on Dbf2

Carver Room

Cytokinesis is the physical process of cell division, which divides the cytoplasm between the two new daughter cells. One important pathway that regulates cytokinesis is called the Mitotic Exit Network, or MEN for short. The MEN is a signaling pathway that allows a dividing cell to complete cytokinesis and exit mitosis. To study cytokinetic defects, budding yeast is used a model organism. Of interest is the regulation of Dbf2, a MEN protein, by phosphorylation. Mutant alleles of the dbf2 gene that prevent phosphorylation or dephosphorylation have been created on a plasmid. The plasmid is duplicated and purified from bacterial cells, then inserted in yeast cells. After growth of the yeast colonies, the cells with Dbf2 mutations can be observed during mitosis through use of fluorescence microscopy to determine the effects of the mutations on cytokinesis.