Title

Magnetron Sputtering of Superconducting Niobium Thin Films

Presenter Information

Skye Tackkett

Department

Physics

Major

Physics

Research Advisor

Kurter, Cihan

Advisor's Department

Physics

Funding Source

UMRB Research Grant; Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE)

Abstract

In the field of condensed matter physics, there has been an ongoing interest in superconducting thin films due to their novel properties. They can be employed in the designs of exotic mesoscopic devices such as metamaterials and superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In this experimental work, we fabricate the niobium thin films with direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering technique and characterize them through resistance vs. temperature measurements. The deposition rate of the fabricated films is determined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) through thickness analysis. Niobium thin films are conducting at room temperature, but become superconducting at cryogenic temperatures with the transition temperature of 8.45 K.

Biography

Skye Tackkett is a second year student majoring in physics and minoring in German and mathematics. After completion of her undergraduate degree, she plans on attending graduate school to earn a Ph.D. in experimental condensed matter physics.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 11th, 9:00 AM Apr 11th, 11:45 AM

Magnetron Sputtering of Superconducting Niobium Thin Films

Upper Atrium/Hallway

In the field of condensed matter physics, there has been an ongoing interest in superconducting thin films due to their novel properties. They can be employed in the designs of exotic mesoscopic devices such as metamaterials and superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In this experimental work, we fabricate the niobium thin films with direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering technique and characterize them through resistance vs. temperature measurements. The deposition rate of the fabricated films is determined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) through thickness analysis. Niobium thin films are conducting at room temperature, but become superconducting at cryogenic temperatures with the transition temperature of 8.45 K.