Title

Creation of an EnvZ-Tar chimera protein in Escherichia coli for use against White Nose Syndrome

Presenter Information

Margaret Pitzer

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE)

Abstract

The fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, causes White Nose Syndrome which is devastating the North American bat population. More and more researchers are working toward combating the deadly disease and restoring the number of bats found in the wild. The bats affected by White Nose Syndrome are a viable asset to the United States Agricultural Industry, and so, a remedy needs to be found.. Our attempt at an answer uses a synthetic biology approach. It is expected that an E. coli strain able to move towards changes in salinity will move to the source of the fungal infection, and use this trait , along with a strain that produces a fungistatic compound, to slow or even stop the infection while the bat is in hibernation.

Biography

Margaret Pitzer is a sophomore at Missouri University of Science and Technology. She is majoring in Chemical Engineering while minoring in German, Business Management and biomedical engineering. She is involved in Residential Life, Miner Multi-Media, and iGEM.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

Comments

Joint Project with Austin Hall and Hanna Kim

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Apr 11th, 9:00 AM Apr 11th, 11:45 AM

Creation of an EnvZ-Tar chimera protein in Escherichia coli for use against White Nose Syndrome

Upper Atrium/Hallway

The fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, causes White Nose Syndrome which is devastating the North American bat population. More and more researchers are working toward combating the deadly disease and restoring the number of bats found in the wild. The bats affected by White Nose Syndrome are a viable asset to the United States Agricultural Industry, and so, a remedy needs to be found.. Our attempt at an answer uses a synthetic biology approach. It is expected that an E. coli strain able to move towards changes in salinity will move to the source of the fungal infection, and use this trait , along with a strain that produces a fungistatic compound, to slow or even stop the infection while the bat is in hibernation.