Title

The Under-investigated Antioxidant Potential of Thiolactic Acid

Presenter Information

Jonathan Kopel

Department

Chemistry

Major

Chemistry

Research Advisor

Ercal, Nuran

Advisor's Department

Chemistry

Funding Source

Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE)

Abstract

Free radicals have numerous physiological functions within the cell, ranging from cellular signaling to the immune response. However, a surge in free radicals has the potential to devastate biological macromolecules, structures, and cellular function. Current research aims to identify the mechanism, effects, and elimination of free radicals through the action of antioxidant compounds, such as vitamin C. In light of this trend, the antioxidant potential of a common industrial thiol, known as thiolactic acid (TLA), was investigated. TLA’s scavenging capability was analyzed using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay and compared with known antioxidants, such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), N-acetylcysteine (NAC), N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), and uric acid, at various concentrations (200 μM-12.5 μM). The percent DPPH scavenged over time was plotted and the inhibitory concentration (IC50) was calculated for each compound. TLA demonstrated the fastest and greatest overall scavenging of DPPH radicals among the antioxidants tested.

Biography

Jonathan Kopel is a senior undergraduate student at Missouri University of Science studying biochemistry. He has worked in Dr. Nuran Ercal’s research laboratory investigating oxidative stress and antioxidant parameters of different compounds. In addition, Jonathan worked as intern at the Edward Doisy Research Center under the direction of Dr. Cho.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 11th, 9:00 AM Apr 11th, 11:45 AM

The Under-investigated Antioxidant Potential of Thiolactic Acid

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Free radicals have numerous physiological functions within the cell, ranging from cellular signaling to the immune response. However, a surge in free radicals has the potential to devastate biological macromolecules, structures, and cellular function. Current research aims to identify the mechanism, effects, and elimination of free radicals through the action of antioxidant compounds, such as vitamin C. In light of this trend, the antioxidant potential of a common industrial thiol, known as thiolactic acid (TLA), was investigated. TLA’s scavenging capability was analyzed using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay and compared with known antioxidants, such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), N-acetylcysteine (NAC), N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), and uric acid, at various concentrations (200 μM-12.5 μM). The percent DPPH scavenged over time was plotted and the inhibitory concentration (IC50) was calculated for each compound. TLA demonstrated the fastest and greatest overall scavenging of DPPH radicals among the antioxidants tested.