Title

Self-Assembling Gold Nanorod Arrays Using DNA Origami

Presenter Information

Kent Gorday

Department

Physics

Major

Physics

Research Advisor

Wang, Risheng

Advisor's Department

Chemistry

Abstract

DNA origami uses many small, single-stranded oligonucleotides to fold a long single-stranded template into a predetermined shape. DNA origami has become a powerful technique for positioning different functional components on nanometer scales because of its programmable nature and ease of self-assembly. To extend these precise positioning capabilities over a larger scale, one- and two-dimensional arrays have been developed using the regular repetition of DNA origami tiles with complementary sticky ends. We assembled arrays of cross-over tiles, then functionalized the tiles with gold nanorods using thiolated linker strands. Methods of purification and incubation were explored for improved binding efficiency and larger ordered arrays as observed by atomic force microscopy. We expect our arrays of gold nanorods to exhibit exotic plasmonic properties based upon their designed orientation.

Biography

Kent Gorday is a sophomore in physics and a member of the International Genetically Engineered Machine design team. He also performs undergraduate research in DNA nanotechnology and participates in the Society of Physics Students as well as the Symphony Orchestra. In his free time, Kent enjoys playing horn, reading, and hiking. Kent intends to continue his education in biophysics after Missouri S&T.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Sciences poster session, Second place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 11th, 9:00 AM Apr 11th, 11:45 AM

Self-Assembling Gold Nanorod Arrays Using DNA Origami

Upper Atrium/Hallway

DNA origami uses many small, single-stranded oligonucleotides to fold a long single-stranded template into a predetermined shape. DNA origami has become a powerful technique for positioning different functional components on nanometer scales because of its programmable nature and ease of self-assembly. To extend these precise positioning capabilities over a larger scale, one- and two-dimensional arrays have been developed using the regular repetition of DNA origami tiles with complementary sticky ends. We assembled arrays of cross-over tiles, then functionalized the tiles with gold nanorods using thiolated linker strands. Methods of purification and incubation were explored for improved binding efficiency and larger ordered arrays as observed by atomic force microscopy. We expect our arrays of gold nanorods to exhibit exotic plasmonic properties based upon their designed orientation.