Title

Regulating Cow Methane Production with Methane Monooxygenase Producing E. Coli

Presenter Information

Jordan Powell

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.
Shannon, Katie

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Second Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

Research has shown strong evidence that greenhouse gases are accountable for the steady increase in temperatures around the world. Methane is among the most notable of the greenhouse gases and is heavily produced through the eructation of livestock, specifically cattle. Current research supports the approach of introducing methane monooxygenase producing E. coli, encapsulated in alginate beads, into the intestinal tract of cows to break down methane before it gets to the rumen. Our adaptation considers the negative effects of breaking down methane by which methanol is created as a byproduct. Methanol, in high enough quantity, can be toxic to the cow, so we look to better control the reaction by having a limiting feature around levels of methanol. With the methanol better regulated, the methane can be both broken down to help eliminate a portion of greenhouse gases, and the cow’s health can be better ensured.

Biography

Jordan Powell is a junior in Biological Sciences. She participates in various activities on campus including being a PRO-Leader, theater and a member of Christian Campus Fellowship. She plans to graduate with a Bachelor of Sciences and pursue a career in field biology.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Comments

Joint Project with Justin Carollo

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Apr 11th, 1:00 PM Apr 11th, 3:00 PM

Regulating Cow Methane Production with Methane Monooxygenase Producing E. Coli

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Research has shown strong evidence that greenhouse gases are accountable for the steady increase in temperatures around the world. Methane is among the most notable of the greenhouse gases and is heavily produced through the eructation of livestock, specifically cattle. Current research supports the approach of introducing methane monooxygenase producing E. coli, encapsulated in alginate beads, into the intestinal tract of cows to break down methane before it gets to the rumen. Our adaptation considers the negative effects of breaking down methane by which methanol is created as a byproduct. Methanol, in high enough quantity, can be toxic to the cow, so we look to better control the reaction by having a limiting feature around levels of methanol. With the methanol better regulated, the methane can be both broken down to help eliminate a portion of greenhouse gases, and the cow’s health can be better ensured.