Title

Detection and Bioremediation: Polychlorinated Biphenyls

Presenter Information

Damien Bizeau

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.
Shannon, Katie

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Second Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of toxic man-made compounds which resist most natural degradation processes. Originally produced for use in electrical components, adaptation for use in industry and construction enabled PCBs to find their way into the environment. PCB toxicity has resulted in the sickening of hundreds of people on multiple continents. To detect and degrade environmental PCBs, a PCB degrading operon cloned from the organism Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, a PCB biosensor, and a kill switch will be designed and inserted into the model organism, E. coli. When this engineered bacteria takes up PCB molecules, gene for a red fluorescent protein as well as the enzymes for PCB degradation will be transcribed and translated, causing the visualization and breakdown of the PCB molecules. The kill switch gene will lyse the engineered bacteria following PCB degradation in order to ameliorate the bioburden of this project.

Biography

Damien Bizeau is a senior in Biological Sciences. Upon graduation, he plans to attend dental school to obtain a DDS.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Comments

Joint project with Elizabeth Thoenen

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Apr 11th, 1:00 PM Apr 11th, 3:00 PM

Detection and Bioremediation: Polychlorinated Biphenyls

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of toxic man-made compounds which resist most natural degradation processes. Originally produced for use in electrical components, adaptation for use in industry and construction enabled PCBs to find their way into the environment. PCB toxicity has resulted in the sickening of hundreds of people on multiple continents. To detect and degrade environmental PCBs, a PCB degrading operon cloned from the organism Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, a PCB biosensor, and a kill switch will be designed and inserted into the model organism, E. coli. When this engineered bacteria takes up PCB molecules, gene for a red fluorescent protein as well as the enzymes for PCB degradation will be transcribed and translated, causing the visualization and breakdown of the PCB molecules. The kill switch gene will lyse the engineered bacteria following PCB degradation in order to ameliorate the bioburden of this project.