Title

Biodiesel Production Using a MSSR (Multi-tubular Supercritical Separative Reactor)

Presenter Information

Trevor Sparks

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Smith, Joseph D.

Advisor's Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Funding Source

Energy Research and Development Center

Abstract

Biodiesel is an alternative fuel source for diesel engines. In comparison to traditional diesel fuels, it is renewable, has a comparatively lesser impact on the environment, and has a reduced amount of toxins in its emissions. Biodiesel can be made using supercritical methanol and waste cooking oil that is common in restaurant and household kitchens. Biodiesel is often produced in a batch process and then later undergoes time-consuming separation processes to retrieve the desired product from the undesired waste. However, the purpose of this research is to design, build, and test a novel reactor that will produce Biodiesel and separate the desired product from the undesired waste in a continuous process using supercritical methanol and waste cooking oil.

Biography

Trevor Sparks is senior in the Chemical Engineering department graduating in May. He is currently researching biodiesel for Dr. Smith. The goal of this research project is to build it as an easily transportable, modular reactor. He is involved in the student and national chapters of AIChE and a local mentoring program for Rolla schools.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Comments

Joint poster project with Adam Richter, Jordan Sanders, and Tyler Johnson

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Apr 11th, 1:00 PM Apr 11th, 3:00 PM

Biodiesel Production Using a MSSR (Multi-tubular Supercritical Separative Reactor)

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Biodiesel is an alternative fuel source for diesel engines. In comparison to traditional diesel fuels, it is renewable, has a comparatively lesser impact on the environment, and has a reduced amount of toxins in its emissions. Biodiesel can be made using supercritical methanol and waste cooking oil that is common in restaurant and household kitchens. Biodiesel is often produced in a batch process and then later undergoes time-consuming separation processes to retrieve the desired product from the undesired waste. However, the purpose of this research is to design, build, and test a novel reactor that will produce Biodiesel and separate the desired product from the undesired waste in a continuous process using supercritical methanol and waste cooking oil.