Title

Biometric Identification using Infrared Imaging

Presenter Information

Katherine Overend

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Major

Electrical Engineering; Physics

Research Advisor

Watkins, Steve Eugene, 1960-

Advisor's Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Funding Source

Applied Optics Laboratory (Honors Project)

Abstract

Infrared (IR) imaging is used for analyzing vein structures for biometric identification. This could be applied in uses such as security scanners and identification (similar to finger print scanners). In this project, IR light (940 nm) is used to capture an image of the backs of hands and identify the vein structure. A camera with a modified filter to allow IR Light pass through is used along with IR LED’s directed toward the focal point of the camera. An experimental setup is demonstrated that compares IR and visible images of hands. These images can be compared to visible light images from a non-modified camera with white light LED’s. The hemoglobin in the veins has a different reflection coefficient than the surface of the skin. This difference is more noticeable with IR light than with visible light.

Biography

Katherine Overend is currently a senior from Lansing, Kansas, majoring in Electrical Engineering and Physics. Her emphasis in Electrical Engineering is Optics and Photonic Devices. She has been doing research with Dr. Watkins since the Fall of 2015. After she graduates, she plans to continue her exploration of optical engineering and image sciences in pursuit of a graduate degree.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 11th, 1:00 PM Apr 11th, 3:00 PM

Biometric Identification using Infrared Imaging

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Infrared (IR) imaging is used for analyzing vein structures for biometric identification. This could be applied in uses such as security scanners and identification (similar to finger print scanners). In this project, IR light (940 nm) is used to capture an image of the backs of hands and identify the vein structure. A camera with a modified filter to allow IR Light pass through is used along with IR LED’s directed toward the focal point of the camera. An experimental setup is demonstrated that compares IR and visible images of hands. These images can be compared to visible light images from a non-modified camera with white light LED’s. The hemoglobin in the veins has a different reflection coefficient than the surface of the skin. This difference is more noticeable with IR light than with visible light.